In today’s current pandemic, one of the topics everyone is discussing is cleaning and disinfecting, especially our hospitals. Cleaning and disinfecting have been a part of veterinary hospital protocols for decades. Every staff member, at some point, will perform a cleaning or disinfecting duty within the hospital. 

Traditional cleaners consist of bleach, accelerated hydrogen peroxide and others. I have realized that often to bring new technology – you often must start by re-educating people on things, they think they already know. Everyone knows how to clean and disinfect, right? Using commercial disinfectants is just as easy as spray and wipe, right? 

In my journey of educating myself on this topic, I realized – I was not even doing it right…… for years……So if I was messing it up, it’s possible others were too, right? I realized I had not read many labels of commercial cleaners, and I was seeing that most of them said the SAME thing. 

Clean with soap and water BEFORE disinfecting AND allow proper dwell time. I started having instant flashbacks of all the times I had cleaned operating rooms – INCORRECTLY. So, let’s say I followed the instructions for use, per the label – including leaving in place for proper dwell time, does that mean my surface is clean? For how long? 

Then I found probiotic cleaners. I know, when you hear probiotics, you think of GI health. I had the same thoughts, then I kept reading. How is it that we can use bacteria to clean and disinfect? 

In an effort, to re-educate us all, on things we thought we knew, I will be using this blog, to shed some light on the benefits of probiotic cleaners, how to properly disinfect and bring new technology to veterinary practices throughout the country. I will also introduce technology that is used to monitor how well we are truly cleaning. 

I hope this information is a new way of thinking about a decade’s old topic. Sometimes change is exactly what we need.

Stay safe. Be well.

Jenny

Jenny Cassibry Fisher
Jenny Cassibry Fisher

Jenny Fisher is a Board Certified Veterinary Oncology Technician with the AIMVT academy. Jenny spent 14 years as the head oncology Technician at LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital, where she worked in the clinic as a medical and radiation oncology technician.